The Right Ventricle Transports Oxygenated Blood To The Lungs – True or False?

The-Right-Ventricle-Transports-Oxygenated-Blood-To-The-Lungs

Is it true that the right ventricle transports oxygenated blood to the lungs? This is a question often asked by health enthusiasts. This is because the heart has a vital function in body. It’s responsible in pumping blood into the circulation and to the different parts of the body.

The blood carries vital nutrients and essential oxygen to all parts of the body for cell nourishment and growth. It also helps in the elimination of toxic waste products from the body by transporting them to the excretory organs.

These organs then excrete these toxic substances away from the body. Without the heart functioning properly, you won’t be alive and kicking. Healthy living wouldn’t be quite possible.

As you may have learned in the past, there are 4 chambers of the heart; the left and right ventricle, and the left and right atria. The right portion of the heart pumps the blood into the lungs, while the left portion pumps blood into the body.

So, to answer the question: “Is it true that the right ventricle transports oxygenated blood to the lungs?” We have to learn first, what exactly are the functions of the different chambers of the heart are - including the right ventricle.

Functions of The 4 Chambers of The Heart

1. Right and Left Atria

These two chambers collect blood flowing into the heart. They are situated on the upper portion of the heart.

2. Right and Left Ventricle

These two chambers pump blood into the lungs or to various parts of the body. These chambers are located in the lower part of the heart.

3. Veins and Arteries

Veins - the veins carry oxygen-poor blood to the heart, except for the pulmonary vein that carries oxygen-rich blood (oxygenated blood) to the left side of the heart. This blood is then pumped into the different parts of the body.

Arteries - the arteries carry oxygen-rich blood to the different parts of the body, except for the pulmonary artery that carries the deoxygenated blood (oxygen-poor blood) from the right side of the heart to the lungs, where the blood is then oxygenated.

Is it True That The Right Ventricle Transports Oxygenated Blood to The Lungs?

The answer is “No, the right ventricle doesn’t transport oxygenated blood to the lungs.” Here’s the explanation.

Here’s the explanation.

1. The Right Ventricle Transports Deoxygenated Blood and not Oxygenated Blood.

While it’s true that the right ventricle transports blood into the lungs; it’s NOT the oxygenated blood that it transports but the deoxygenated or non-oxygenated blood, or the oxygen-poor type of blood coming from the right atrium. This is then pumped into the pulmonary artery, then into the lungs.

2. It’s the Deoxygenated Blood That Enters the Lungs.

The lungs allow deoxygenated blood to enter for oxygenation. Hence, the type of blood that the ventricles pump into the lungs is the non-oxygenated blood, or the oxygen-poor blood.

3. The Function of the Lungs is to Oxygenate Blood.

The non-oxygenated blood then gets oxygenated in the lungs, and is then pumped back into the body. The function of the lungs is to eliminate the carbon dioxide from the blood and obtain oxygen for the blood cells.

The important fact to remember is that each of the chambers has specific functions that allow blood to be pumped continuously to and from the heart to the lungs, and to the various parts of the body.

To know more about the right ventricle, here’s a video discussing the topic specifically:

Conclusion

I have answered the question: Is it true that the right ventricle transports oxygenated blood to the lungs? And I have explained why the answer is ‘No”. It’s crucial to bear in mind that what goes into the lungs is non-oxygenated blood and what comes from the lungs is oxygenated blood.

This is because the lungs oxygenate the blood from the atmosphere, while discarding carbon dioxide. If you remember this fact, then you won’t have any difficulty in remembering what the right ventricle’s function is.

Do you have a similar question about the heart? Or do you have something to contribute to the discussion? Feel free to leave your comment below and let the readers know about it.

Adelaide

Hello everyone! I’m glad to have you here. I’m a medical technologist by profession. My second love is writing. So, I’m focusing on providing content to help other people with their health problems. I hope I can be of help to you.

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